"The oral testimonies of the indigenous people, men and women, community leaders and ordinary people, who give a face to this country, need to be recorded if an all-inclusive history of South Africa is ever to be written"  
News
1st Limpopo Provincial Oral History Conference.
The inaugural Limpopo Oral History  Conference took place in Phalaborwa, Hans Merensky Hotel  from 60th – 08th September 2017, under the theme “Of Memories and Memorialisation”. The conference was held in partnership with University of Limpopo, university of Venda and Department of Education.
 
The aim is to inculcate the culture of Oral History, which entails the collection and study of historical information using tape recording of interviews with people having personal knowledge of past events.
 
“Limpopo has a rich tangible and intangible cultural heritage which must be recorded to ensure that its story, including our customs and indigenous knowledge system is preserved for the future generation” said the MEC for Sport Arts and culture, mme Onicca Moloi during her address.
 
Attendees included amongst, academics, school learners, researchers, Archivists, Historians, records managers, etc.
 
Mpumalanga Provincial Archives: Oral History Alive and well in Mpumalanga

Mpumalanga’s oral history practitioners have vowed to grow their community to reflect the population dynamics of the province. This emerged at the 4th Oral History Conference recently held in Ermelo. The one day gathering brought together researchers, speakers, learners, academics and members of the public under the theme ‘The cultural unity of African and Africans: Testimonies’.

The conference was held under the auspices of Oral History Association of Mpumalanga Province and Mpumalanga Archives and Records Management Services, a partnership that should be a federation made up of oral history practitioners from traditional healers, leaders, storytellers, artists, academics and intellectuals. Up to now, it has struggled to attract other stakeholders who are both custodians and practitioners of oral history. Delivering the keynote address on behalf of the MEC for Arts and Culture Mahlangu, Msukalikwa Acting mayorAdileen Juliette Bal said, “Oral history is an important part of our existence as African people. To a larger extent it is the reason we hold on to our heritage of campfire tales and valuing our Gogos who are the conduits of wisdom and folklore.”


                                                                       

Read more...
 
MY MOTHER HARRIET DICHABE BY RUTH WALLIS

My mother, Mme Harriet Mookho Dichabe, was born in 1928 in the district of Herschel in the Eastern Cape. It is close to the Free State - the town of Zastron is about 40km away and Lesotho’s south western areas which are also a short drive away but with border posts that have to be crossed and passports checked. She was born into a Christian home, and for as long as she can remember church every Sunday was the family norm. As soon as she was old enough she joined the church choir; singing was her first love and an innate gift which she nurtured.

Until she was to be married, she grew up as a Methodist and her faith blossomed as she learnt about the teachings in the Bible and came to understand God’s love for his children, although time has nibbled at her memory she remembers some of her favourite Bible verses, words that resonated with her then and resonate with her now. Losing faith in her Creator was not something that ever crossed her mind. She felt blessed no matter the circumstances.

She inherited the family name, Olifant, which is an Afrikaans word meaning Elephant. How we came by that name I do not know but it is quite common among the Xhosa people. The family were Xhosa speaking people but because of our closeness to Lesotho we spoke seSotho as well.

From the church choir to the school choir the young Harriet seized every opportunity to hone her talent. This was not some hidden love affair it was a full - on personal display of affection, her appreciation for this wonderful thing called music grew by the minute, it’s no wonder she was the lead in the choir. Naturally homework and chores disturbed the rhythm, perhaps on the exterior, perhaps the notes danced in her ears as she thought about practice and how she was due for practice again the following afternoon, how Mr Mohapeloa, the choir conductor, must have been composing yet another song just by listening to the lovely tune of the chirping birds all around. That was pure excitement, her gift from God.

 Click here to download the full story

 

 
Coffee Table Publication: Stories of South African Women: 2017

Dear Colleague

I make an earnest appeal to you to please write for our publication. Your participation will ensure that South African Women of all races, places and spaces will be applauded, appreciated and acknowledged because of your engagement, enlightenment and empowerment.  You are encouraged to please write an article that Tells your Story (if you are a woman) OR Your Mother’s (or any other female that has influenced you) Story. It should be Arial size 10, single line spacing. You could write in paragraphs, using sub-headings. Pictures also make for interesting reading and captures the moment.  The following information or format could be used in your write up. However, there is ample room for creativity. Please note that you are not restricted to sticking to this format. You may even use a combination of the options.

Read more here

 
COFFEE TABLE PUBLICATION: TELL YOUR MOTHERíS STORY

FROM THE DESK OF THE INTERNATIONAL & PARTNERSHIPS PORTFOLIO
COFFEE TABLE PUBLICATION: TELL YOUR MOTHER’S STORY

 

Dear Members and Patrons,

2016 marks the 60th anniversary of the historic Women’s March to the Union Buildings in Pretoria protesting against the oppressive pass laws. In recognition of the remarkable but often marginalized role played by women in South Africa, OHASA requests you to please write for our Coffee Table Publication that will record WOMEN’S STORIES. It is a national imperative to recall our past in order to give credibility to our future. Your mother’s story is required to complete the kaleidoscope of South African women experiences, their trials, tribulations and achievements. As we celebrate our heritage, there is a need to complete the tapestry that yields so many gaps.

Click here to read more....

 
Launch of Coffee Table Publication: Stories of South African Women: October 2016

Dear Colleague

 I make an earnest appeal to you to please write for our publication. Your participation will ensure that South African Women of all races, places and spaces will be applauded, appreciated and acknowledged because of your engagement, enlightenment and empowerment.

You are encouraged to please write a one page (A4, +/- 900 word) article that Tells your Story (if you are a woman) OR Your Mother’s Story. It should be Arial size 10, single line spacing. You could write in paragraphs, using sub-headings. Pictures also make for interesting reading and captures the moment. 

The following information or format could be used in your write up. However, there is ample room for creativity. Please note that you are not restricted to sticking to this format. You may even use a combination of the options.

DATE OF SUBMISSION: 15 August 2016

OPTION 1

 

Stages in life

Experiences

Content

1

Birth to two years:

Where were you born? Year?

Parents: Explain family background. Extended family.

 

2

Early  life

School, friends, family, life in general under apartheid

What was your life like while growing up?  Who were the important role players in your life?  What did you enjoy most while growing up? 

 

3

Teenage years

Difficulties / cultural disputes/ moral challenges

Did you face peer pressure? What influence did your culture / belief system have on you? Any memory of superstition / old wives tales/  folk tales / storytelling that shaped you?

4

Young adult life under apartheid

Trials / struggles / successes

Success to include family, children, spouse etc. influence of adult friends / civic groups etc

5

Marriage / children / extended family life

What experiences can you share? Economic difficulties? Social issues? Political strife? The environment?

Did you work? Were you protected at the workplace?

Remuneration? Uniforms?

Travelling?

6

Mature adult

Changes in the country?

You contribution.

Were you active in movements that led to change?

Other experiences that you may have had. 

7

At present

Share your thoughts… hope for the future? Sadness? Achievements, etc.

If you could change anything what would it be and why?

 

OPTION 2

  1. Brief biography

This should cover birth, early childhood, schooling and life after schooling.

  1. A memorable moment in your life or mother’s life under apartheid.

It is almost given that when you request people to write about their lives under apartheid they would focus on the hardships and their resistance to apartheid, i.e. political activism. This is true for many people, and women in particular who, regrettably their histories still remain ‘hidden’.  Contributors are urged to write about this.  Colleagues are strongly urged to begin to document about other aspects of their lives that remain dormant.

Description: http://www.phuthu.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/womens-day.jpg   

Contributors are also encouraged to write about any aspect of their life or their mother’s life that they feel is pertinent and deserves to be documented. These could range from challenges unmarried women, especially black women, faced in acquiring accommodation in the urban areas; how they managed to survive and raise children, sometimes single-handedly through what the then government perceived as illegal means (e.g. beer brewing or street hawking); entertainment careers (Contributors must write about their memories or that of their mothers who were aspiring musicians, artists, sport enthusiasts, etc, in their communities); community developers, but due to apartheid laws, which restricted the advancement of black people, they struggled to achieve their dreams. 

 

  1. View about post-apartheid South Africa: Hope/Dream for the future? Sadness? Achievements, etc.

 

OPTION 3

Writers are also encouraged to tell community stories. Perhaps an individual wants to pay for the page that pays homage to his / her crèche / sporting club etc. Then the story / page could revolve around the women that played the pivotal role in the formative years.

In Conclusion, remember to be creative. You can write as family or as a group. We are looking for stories that cover the length and breadth of our country. We are looking for women’s tales from all provinces, the plaas, the plush neighbourhoods and townships. Join me in telling women’s stories. This is a great initiative. Please be involved.

BANKING DETAILS

R 1000 per page

R500 = ½ page

R250 = ¼ page

 

OHASA, ABSA Bank, Pretoria, Account No:  4067826673,

 

Description: http://www.saha.org.za/resources/images/CollectionItems/AL2446_4509.jpgPLEASE NOTE:  Payment REFERENCES MUST reflect “Your Name, Surname and Publication

 

This will help us in identifying the contributors.  Unidentified payments will be put into a suspense account and will result in the suspension on your subscription.

 

Should you require any further information, please contact Dr Archary on This email address is being protected from spam bots, you need Javascript enabled to view it

 

Regards

Dr Kogie Archary

 
OHASA GALA DINNER
OHASA invites you to join us in A GALA FUNDRAISING DINNER Celebrating the Contributions, Struggle & Significance of South African Women In Commemoration of the 100thANNIVERSARY of the 1913 NATIVES LAND ACT.

ADDRESS: ANGELUS MISSION CHURCH HALL, 25 SIPHOSETHU ROAD [Off Golf Course Road], MT EDGECOMBE.
DATE : 23 AUGUST 2013
TIME: 7:00 pm [WELCOME DRINKS @ 6:30 pm]
ATTIRE : Traditional or Smart Casual
DONATION : R250 PER COUPLE
CONTACT: Dr Kogie Archary on 072 856 1988

Proceeds Will Go Towards Enhancing Our Oral History Heritage [OHASA] & Supporting Women Empowerment [The SARI Foundation]
 
OHASA CONFERENCE - CALL FOR PAPERS EXTENDED
Take note of the National Annual Oral History Conference taking place on 8 to 11 October 2013. We would like to inform you that the closing date on call for papers has been EXTENDED to 16 August 2013. Please inform other interested colleagues about this matter.

We are looking forward to seeing you in Kimberley in October 2013.

Regards,

Dennis Maake
 
Courageous Conversations

175th Commemoration of the Battle of Blood River/Ncome & a nation’s striving for reconciliation

“True reconciliation does not consist in merely forgetting the past.” 

 FORMER President Nelson Mandela

Date: 6 - 8 November 2013

Venue: Ncome Museum (43km from Dundee, 24 km from Nqutu)

On 16 December 1838 the Zulu people and Voortrekkers were locked in a deadly battle with one another. This was the result of a protracted period of mistrust, conflict and antagonism towards one another. From thereon there was on-going suspicion and ill feeling. Southern Africa over time continued to be caught up in tension and turmoil.

Read more...
 
Publication: Culture, Memory and Trauma

The first volume of OHASA Conference Proceedings, Culture, Memory and Trauma is now available.  We are excited about this publication since so few publications in oral history are available in South Africa, despite its rich history that can only be accessed through oral history interviewing. 

There are two more volumes of OHASA Conference Proceedings underway, that will be available by the middle of June 2013. 

Volume 2, Oral history: Representing the hidden, the untold and the veiled, contains the Proceedings of the fifth and sixth OHASA Conferences (2008 and 2009) which were held in East London (Eastern Cape) and Cape Town (Western Cape) respectively.

Volume 3, Oral history: Heritage and identity, represents the three recent conferences that were held between 2010 and 2012 in White River (Mpumalanga), Mahikeng (North West), and Mangaung (Free State).  They were the seventh, eighth and ninth OHASA Conferences.

 
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